Get tickets to see Kansas in the Sweet Sixteen

Kansas has given fans yet another year to travel to see them on the road in March Madness.

Kansas fans got lucky – again. The No. 1 Jayhawks will play in the Sweet Sixteen  of the NCAA Tournament in Omaha beginning Friday, marking the second time in two years that Kansas is a “home team.” In the 2017 Midwest Regional, the Jayhawks played in Kansas City.

Kansas’ presence at the Midwest Regional may well be why that regional is currently the priciest of the four. As of Wednesday, according to data from TicketIQ.com, a secondary marketplace with data from hundreds of secondary sites, including the official NCAA ticket exchange, powered by Primesport, the average asking price for a ticket on the secondary market was $631. The next most expensive is the Los Angeles West Regional, at $434. The price for the 2018 Midwest Regional is the second most expensive of the decade, behind, yep, you guessed it, the Midwest Regional at KC in 2017, which settled at $652.

Kansas, Midwest Regional at Omaha

Average Price: $631, Cheapest Ticket: $210

Kansas’ biggest stumbling block to the Final Four is Duke, seeded No. 2 and still alive in the Midwest. But another player is No. 11 Syracuse, which got into the final 64 through the First Four, and has since upset both TCU and No. 3 Michigan State. The Jayhawks should have little trouble getting past Clemson in the Sweet Sixteen, but whether it’s Duke or Syracuse for the Regional Final (Elite Eight), the Jayhawks will still be favored, though the competition will step up a notch.

Because Kansas has such a rabid following – and it’s only about a three-hour drive from Lawrence to Omaha, tickets for the Midwest Regional are in short supply, and the get-in price for the regional is not only the most expensive of the four, but is also more than the get-in price for the Final Four ($194) or National Championship ($182), according to TicketIQ.com.

Final Four, San Antonio:  Average Price $804; Cheapest Ticket $194

Championship Game, San Antonio: Average Price $627; Cheapest Ticket $182

For Kansas fans brimming with confidence about their team’s chances, a trip to San Antonio is still doable. Ticket prices for the Final Four and National Championship are up more than 10% over the first week of March Madness. While the first week was filled with upsets like never before, Kansas is among the big-time schools remaining that travel well. Others are Michigan, Duke and Syracuse.  While they don’t have the basketball pedigree of those big four, Texas A&M – less than three hours from San Antonio – is the Cinderella that could drive prices at the Alamodome to the next level.

For Kansas fans looking for a premium experience, PrimeSport offers a range VIP Experiences, that allow fans the opportunity to see all three games, along with free food and drinks at the Official Pregame NCAA VIP Experience at the San Antonio Convention Center, a 10-minute trip to AT&T Center. PrimeSport’s VIP Experiences are almost sold out.

The Official Pregame NCAA VIP Experience will have live music, celebrity appearances by Seth Davis and former Spur Sean Elliott.  The VIP Experience will be open on Saturday, March 31 from 12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. and Monday, April 2 from 3:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.

For the games, these VIP packages also comes with open bar, food stations and seats in sections 201-204 and 242-244, or sections 111-113. These VIP Experience tickets start from $528 on Primesport.com.

If that’s not VIP enough, the Courtside Club package, available to certain ticket types provides an open bar and endless food, the package also comes with a “Chalk Talk” with yet-to-be named NCAA coaches, and time for some selfies with the Final Four trophy.  Perhaps most impressive, some PrimeSport packages are actually less expensive than the same ticket on StubHub, without any of the food or access.

For companies that are looking to go to the next level, PrimeSport also has private suites available. These suites include a behind-the-scenes tour, an on-court photo, front-row seating at practice and even a locker room tour. Regardless of who has their “One Shining Moment” on the court, that would be a Final Four for the ages.